Peep, peep! Live from our roof...

Flock of peeps in a cage playing baseball 

​Spring has spru​ng, and we're getting into the spirit of the season! We've given one of our Northwest Profiles, the "Urban Chicken Farmer," access to the roof of our Seattle office this week to keep a flock of Marshm​​allow Peeps. The quintessential spring candies are housed in a small coop, and have a great view of Lake Union. 

Want to take a look? The Urban Chicken Farmer is video-casting her flock over the Internet to keep an eye on her Peeps, and you can watch the live stream here. Today the Peeps are getting in the spirit for the Mariners' Opening Day in Seattle, and are ready to play ball – but be sure to check back through the week, because you never know what fun and mischief they'll get up to later!

Chickens probably wouldn't do as well in the elements, but NW Peeps are a little bit different. They withstand the coldest of spring rains, and tolerate infrequent blinding blasts of sun. They're a sure sign that spring is here – even when it doesn't feel that way. 

PEMCO PEEP FAQ

Q) Are you serious? What does this have to do with insurance?

A) Yes, totally serious. It has nothing to do with insurance; it's all about having some springtime fun! We're certainly not the only ones to play around with Peeps – check out some of the crafts and dioramas at the official Peeps website and entries in last year's annual Seattle Times Peeps Contest

Q) What is this costing us?

A) It's a minimal cost. Peeps are pretty cheap, and they don't eat much. And the Urban Chicken Farmer is donating her time to care for the Peeps. We already owned the rooftop camera.

Q) How can I see the flock?

A) The Urban Chicken Farmer is video-casting her flock over the Internet. You can watch the live stream​ here.

Q) Were any Peeps harmed during this stunt?

A) No. We've taken steps to maintain a safe environment for the Peeps. They're getting fresh food (sugar cubes, jelly beans) and exercise daily. They also have a nice water feature in the corner of their coop. Also, their coop is designed with slats small enough to keep crows, seagulls, and other predatory birds at bay (we hope). Plus, Northwest Peeps are pretty hardy. 

Q) What happens to the Peeps after Easter? Will they get eaten?

A) No! The Urban Chicken Farmer will move the flock to a larger coop at her home. The Peeps will happily live out their lives there, surrounded by other Peeps. We'll use the footage we captured during the weeklong Peeps project to create a time-lapse video and/or a greatest moments clip compilation afterward, and post it to our YouTube channel. The Peeps will live on forever online!​

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