Playful Marshawn Lynch usurps Beast Mode

Cast as too silent by Super Bowl media, Marshawn Lynch unleashed his alter ego during Wednesday's downtown Seattle victory parade.
   Lynch led the team along the parade route from atop an amphibious Duck, tossing Skittles at the crowd.
   Somewhere along the line he picked up a drum and beat it with wild abandon. He continued to pound away as the procession entered CenturyLink Field.
   But he wasn't done. With boyish exuberance, Lynch reared back and whacked his drum even while the mayor spoke. That was after he'd shown more of his rascally side by spraying Russell Wilson and the revered Lombardi trophy with shaken bubbly.
   I managed to watch all of this after hoofing it from PEMCO into downtown, where I hit a near-impenetrable mass of humanity at Westlake Center.
   Retreating one block east to 5th Avenue, huge crowds remained, but I was able to weave my way south to James Street, which I followed to Occidental Park.
   Before me a sea of Seahawks 12s spread all the way to the Clink. I arrived just as the gates opened.
   It was 10:30. Flush from my long walk, I took a seat on the south side at the 50-yard line – seat 12, of course – and peeled off my goose-down mountain parka.
   Twenty minutes later, the sun disappeared behind the roof and I got cold. Real cold. Put the parka back on. Cinched down the hood. Put on gloves.
   I ended up being cold for five hours. Can't remember the last time I was that cold for that long!
   But it was worth it.
   Big screens in the Clink showed the parade rolling down 4th Avenue. Sometime around 2:30, the team convoy arrived, led by the drum-bashing Lynch.
   News media reported the downtown crowd totaled 700,000, more than the population of Seattle proper. In contrast, the 1979 Seattle SuperSonics victory-parade crowd was estimated at "just" 200,000 or 300,000.
   The audio in the Clink wasn't super clear, but I thought I heard Wilson say we'll repeat the whole scene next year.
   That would be fun. But I'm grateful just to have been part of this rare, epic moment. Frozen feet and all.

by  Jon Osterberg

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