Honoring one of our veterans

​We're proud to spotlight the talented employees we have at PEMCO and share what makes them so inspiring both inside and outside of work. With Veterans Day on Nov. 11 it's the perfect time for us to honor employees, friends, and family members who have served.

Recently, we caught up with Cynthia Cox, Records Management Specialist, and talked about her time serving in the Air Force.

Q: Tell us in one sentence, what do you do at PEMCO?

I'm a Records Management Specialist which includes sorting mail, scanning, data entry, tape and document retrieval, packaging and posting mail, creating CDs for claims use and maintaining Secured Storage Boxes and records.

Q: What's the best part about your job?

I love the variety of the work but if I had to choose I really like handling the Secured Storage databases and boxes.

Q: When you're not at work, what are you up to?

For the past three years, I have been focusing on planning and making my retirement home ready for move in. I bought a 1940's home that was/is in need of a lot of tender loving care. I only paid $15,000 for it and by the time it is move in ready, I will have about $50,000 total into it. The inside will be done but it will still need some outside work. It will take a couple of years after I retire to finish the outside. Besides that I do sewing, go to lunch with my friends, research special interest topics online, and take care of my cat.

Q: Tell us about your experience in the United States Armed Forces. (What branch did you serve in, for how long, role?)

I was in the Air Force for just under three years. My job title was Electronic Warfare Specialist. I was one of the first women to be allowed in the field. Believe me, it was very odd to be the only female in a shop with 42 men. I worked mostly on pods that hung on the wing and some equipment in the cockpit of A7's, A10's, C130's and B52's.

Q:  Why did you decide to go into the military?

I have always been on the patriotic side and it runs in the family. I have family members in Air Force, Army, and the Navy. I had a long talk with my uncle who was career Army before choosing the branch. I had a partial scholarship to a local junior college and attended for one year but my parents would not pay for college and I could not get any other financial help because they made too much money for me to qualify. I just felt I needed to go see the world and gain some work experience. The fact that the GI Bill was there helped point me that direction.

Q: Is there anything else you'd like to share about your military experience?

I was warned by my on the job training coach not to mention that I could type because they would designate me to the job automatically if I did. That ended up being the first question that the shop chief asked me. I just smiled and said "I hunt and peck just like you do." I gained two nicknames in the Air Force: Tex, because I was from Texas and Superwoman, because I was the only female in the shop that did not have to ask for help lifting the pod sections (82 lbs.).

Q:  What lesson(s) did you learn that you still live by or remember today?

"Always treat people right." I think that is why I always felt that I should do the right thing. This I learned from my great grandparents. We stayed at their home when I was very young. My great grandfather used to be a Railroad Car Inspector. The hobos used to jump the trains and get off as they came into the yards. They knew that they could go to the back door of his house and they could get a bath, a meal and a place to sleep for the night.

Q: One final question – what's the motto you live by – a quote or saying that guides you?

Take care of the necessities and the rest will work itself out. The order goes like this: Pay the bills first, put gas in the car, buy the food you need, make what you can, do something for fun every month and the rest goes in the bank for a rainy day.

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